Wednesday, 14 January 2015

Men's Marital Status and Risk of Developing Diabetes

Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston Massachusetts, the University of California in San Francisco, and Columbia University in New York, USA, compared men's marital status and risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Their work was reported on in the online journal PLos One in October 2014.
The study included 41,378 men who did not have Type 2 diabetes at the beginning of the project. Twenty-two years later 2,252 cases of Type 2 diabetes had been diagnosed...
  • unmarried men had a 16 percent higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than did married men.
  • divorced and separated men had about the same risk as married men, while
  • widowers had a 29 percent higher risk, and
  • never married men had a 17 percent higher risk.

From these results, researchers concluded not being married, and especially being widowed, was associated with a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. They suggest the increased risk in widowers could be due to changes in lifestyle, diet, and obesity. They offered no explanation for the higher risk of Type 2 diabetes in never married and divorced men, who tend to have less overweight and obesity than married men.
In 2006 the journal Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise reported the results of a study on marital status and physical activity in 3075 men 70 to 79 years of age.

It was found married men reported more physical exercise than single men, and active men were more likely to have active wives than were inactive men. Therefore it was concluded marital status and wives' activity levels influenced exercise levels among older men.
In January 2014, the journal Social Science Medicine reported on a study that looked at dietary quality in adults over 50 years of age. Scientists at the University of Cambridge in the UK found single or widowed individuals, particularly men, were less likely to eat a variety of fruits and vegetables than were married individuals, or those with frequent friend contact.
More research will likely discover why married men had a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. In the meantime, three basic things can help lower anyone's risk of developing the condition...
  1. maintaining normal weight, with a body mass index below 25, is a good start.
  2. a diet rich in a variety of fruits and vegetables and little or no meat is also helpful.
  3. consistently getting enough physical activity is good for avoiding not only diabetes but a host of other ills.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

Vegetable highly recommended to reduce diabeties

It's not necessarily what you eat that causes Type 2 diabetes, it's also what you don't eat. Vegetables are in the food group where the carbohydrate content is very low. They are also high in dietary fiber, which helps to smooth blood sugar peaks associated with food intake. They are also the food group often avoided.
Side dishes present a terrific opportunity to add health-promoting vegetables to meals. The trouble is convenience often drives our side dish choices which is why prepackaged potato and rice mixes are on many dinner tables while vegetables are often missing.
Stir-frying is a fast and easy way to get a double dose of vegetables in, keep your calorie intake low, and prepare a fast meal on the run. As such, it's a go-to for many people on those busy weekday nights when they're trying to stay healthy.
But, could you be doing more to improve that stir-fry? If you use the same vegetables over and over again, it's time for a change. Not only will doing so help to prevent dietary boredom, but it'll also help ensure you are getting a variety of different nutrients into your day as well.
Here are some delicious stir-fry vegetables for you to consider...
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Shredded Cabbage. Cabbage is an often overlooked vegetable that can bring many health benefits to your stir-fry. It's rich in antioxidants, so a great cancer fighter and is also a great source of vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin B6, manganese, potassium, copper, and vitamin B1.

With so many nutrients lined up with this food, it's a can't miss health wonder.
Bok Choy. Very close in nutritional value is bok choy which, unlike cabbage, also contains some of the important omega-3 fatty acids that you need to sustain optimal health.
This vegetable is also a great source of zinc, another mineral cabbage doesn't contain. Bok choy is going to provide an excellent dose of vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium, calcium, as well as vitamin B6.
It stir-fries up deliciously and will liven up any meal in a hurry.
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Baby Corn. If you feel you need a taste of sweetness in your stir-fry, rather than turning to a calorie-laden sauce that contains a high dose of sugar, try adding baby corn instead.
These are low in calories and will also provide a good dose of fiber, keeping your blood sugar levels stable.
Spinach. Finally, the great green vegetable we could all stand to eat more of - don't ever neglect spinach. It's rich in iron and low in calories, making it an ideal staple for any stir-fry.
So have a look at your current recipe line-up. Is it getting stale? Are you avoiding vegetables? If so, try adding one of these great vegetables during your next meal.
Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels.
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Add Health-Promoting Vegetables to Your Meals to Help Lower Blood Sugar

It's not necessarily what you eat that causes Type 2 diabetes, it's also what you don't eat. Vegetables are in the food group where the carbohydrate content is very low. They are also high in dietary fiber, which helps to smooth blood sugar peaks associated with food intake. They are also the food group often avoided.
Side dishes present a terrific opportunity to add health-promoting vegetables to meals. The trouble is convenience often drives our side dish choices which is why prepackaged potato and rice mixes are on many dinner tables while vegetables are often missing.
Stir-frying is a fast and easy way to get a double dose of vegetables in, keep your calorie intake low, and prepare a fast meal on the run. As such, it's a go-to for many people on those busy weekday nights when they're trying to stay healthy.
But, could you be doing more to improve that stir-fry? If you use the same vegetables over and over again, it's time for a change. Not only will doing so help to prevent dietary boredom, but it'll also help ensure you are getting a variety of different nutrients into your day as well.
Here are some delicious stir-fry vegetables for you to consider...
Shredded Cabbage. Cabbage is an often overlooked vegetable that can bring many health benefits to your stir-fry. It's rich in antioxidants, so a great cancer fighter and is also a great source of vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin B6, manganese, potassium, copper, and vitamin B1.
With so many nutrients lined up with this food, it's a can't miss health wonder.
Bok Choy. Very close in nutritional value is bok choy which, unlike cabbage, also contains some of the important omega-3 fatty acids that you need to sustain optimal health.
This vegetable is also a great source of zinc, another mineral cabbage doesn't contain. Bok choy is going to provide an excellent dose of vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium, calcium, as well as vitamin B6.
It stir-fries up deliciously and will liven up any meal in a hurry.
Baby Corn. If you feel you need a taste of sweetness in your stir-fry, rather than turning to a calorie-laden sauce that contains a high dose of sugar, try adding baby corn instead.
These are low in calories and will also provide a good dose of fiber, keeping your blood sugar levels stable.
Spinach. Finally, the great green vegetable we could all stand to eat more of - don't ever neglect spinach. It's rich in iron and low in calories, making it an ideal staple for any stir-fry.
So have a look at your current recipe line-up. Is it getting stale? Are you avoiding vegetables? If so, try adding one of these great vegetables during your next meal.
Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels.

Diabeties and High Blood Sugar

The ankle to brachial index is used to diagnose peripheral artery disease, an important warning sign to get busy preventing heart attacks and strokes. Blood pressure is measured in the ankle and arm and the former is divided by the latter. A normal value is 1.0 to 1.4. A number above or below normal indicates peripheral artery disease. Many times the index is repeated after exercise. If the blood pressure reading goes down after exercise, this also indicates peripheral artery disease. According to an article published in October 2014 in PLoS One, the ankle to brachial index could also serve as a valuable tool in detecting diabetic kidney disease in its early stages.
At present there are several tests for diagnosing chronic kidney disease. One way is to measure protein in the urine. Diseased kidneys spill albumin from the blood into the kidneys - rather than retaining it in the blood. The glomerular filtration rate is a measure of how efficiently the kidneys are cleaning the blood...
  • blood levels of creatinine are measured to determine how well the kidneys are removing creatinine from the blood.
  • blood urea nitrogen is another test to see how well the kidneys are cleaning the blood.
  • various imaging tests of the kidneys are also used.

Researchers at Zheijang University in Hangzhou, and other universities in China, enrolled 448 Type 2 diabetic patients with normal, negative tests for albumin in their urine. They were divided into two groups according to their glomerular filtration rates. It was found the participants with only slightly low glomerular filtration rates and abnormal ankle to brachial indexes had a high rate of early chronic kidney disease diagnosed by other methods.

From these results researchers concluded anyone who registered abnormal ankle to brachial indexes and only slightly slow filtration rates, should be further tested for chronic kidney disease.
Early signs and symptoms of chronic kidney disease include...
  • high blood pressure,
  • tiredness,
  • malaise,
  • headaches,
  • dry,
  • itchy skin,
  • nausea, and
  • unexplained weight loss.

It is treated with medication, diet, and exercise. ACE inhibitors, a type of blood pressure-lowering medication is often prescribed. A diet low in fat and cholesterol, sodium, and potassium is also recommended. Type 2 diabetics with kidney disease are advised...
  • not to smoke and
  • perform exercise at least two or three times a week.

Going for regular medical checkups and beginning treatment early will help keep diabetic kidney disease from progressing. Consider discussing ankle to brachial index with your doctor.
Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels.